Latest blog posts

Getting Mold and Mildew Out of Your Car Interior

We have all experienced the horror of that friend who has the “smelly car.” No amount of persuasion can keep him from driving, and for some indiscernible reason, his car is just too smelly to stand. While this is not the only solution, many small problems in vehicles come down to mold or mildew growth somewhere within the car. The...

The Interior of the Car at the Right Temperature

Having the right temperature inside our car is paramount for our comfort, and also for our safety. The heating is something that all cars had almost since they started using closed bodies, but having air conditioning in the car was not as usual as it is now. Initially, only the most expensive vehicles had air conditioning, considered almost like an...

Do You Know How to Tell If Water Has Damaged Your Car?

The Car Care Council just issued a press release with helpful tips for drivers to determine if their car suffered is something that can be hard to detect and even harder to remove. If the car was recently driven by a significant amount of standing or moving you should follow the tips in their press release to scrutinize car to...

Discover Distance In between Cities and be Happier

Life is all about motion. We continuously move as well as figuratively talking. Travelling can make our life more fascinating. It’s clinically proven that individuals who travel would be the happiest on the planet. It’s time for you to inject a few happiness as well as hit the street even for a brief period of period. New locations, exciting tales,...

My 1969 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu: The Best Vehicle I've Ever Owned

I have owned a few vehicles in my day. However, none have compared to my very first car. It all started when as a teenager and arriving home after my babysitting job and finishing homework, I heard my dad mention that I get “a real job.” My first thought was that I am already purchasing all of my necessities and...

Your Auto Insurance Policy

The most irritating point ever before is acquiring the entire operate all-around from your auto insurance policy business after you have had the misfortune of having an incident. If you’re exhausted from the stalling, procrastination and nitpicking your car or truck insurance coverage business is handing out due to your vehicle incident insurance policies claim, just take a quantity and...

How to Replace Car Headlights

Jobs such as changing a front or backlight may sound daunting - but the situation is relatively merely as we explain here. Most drivers will not even realize they have a headlight or backlight out until a kind, fellow drivers tell them. Either that or when they are given a ticket by not so kind police officers! Replacing a light...

The Effects Of insufficient Sleep

Sleep the most important when it comes to human health and beauty. The effects of insufficient sleep are devastating to the body, and they include dizziness, loss of appetite, fatigue, loss of memory, the risk of car accidents impaired thinking. Also sleep deprivation affects the beauty of a woman much because insomnia causes hair loss, dry skin, dark circles around...

Choosing the Perfect Pillow for You

With the instances of car crashes growing more and more frequent, there is also an increase in minor to major injuries resulting from those collisions. If you’ve been involved in a car accident and you have recurring pain in any part of your body, it can severely disrupt your life. Whether it’s a nagging limp in your leg or persistent...

Tinkerin Tips

For many years, Ted Aschman collected and shared several pages of Tinkerin Tips in each edition of the Vintage Ford Magazine. His wife, Carolyn, has kindly agreed to let us share them in the Texas Touring Ts publications. Art has abbreviated the article so it will better fit in the newsletter. Any additions are in italics. Check out the Keep It Running tab.

Request for Stories

Nancy has stepped up and is our new newsletter editor. Thank you, Nancy, for taking on this responsibility. Ginger is still webmaster for the Texas Touring Ts and for the Brazos Valley As and we welcome your input and any articles or announcements that need to be sent to our members or readers.

If you have any stories you would like to include in the newsletter, send them along to Nancy; articles for the website should be sent to Ginger.


Want to Have Some Fun?

Jump over to the Just for Fun tab of this website and use your mouse to scoot the pieces of a puzzle into place or discover a few of Henry Ford's quotes. If you have visited this page in the past, there is a new puzzle and the quotes have just been added.


Features on Website

Have you ever wondered about the photos in the banners at the top of each page on this website? At the bottom of each page, there will be some information about the people in the banners, their location, and some tips "From the Garage" that would be helpful if you decide to visit the location.

To help you find that article you're looking for, a site map was recently added. The entries reference the newsletters and the website . . . no more hunting for that special article any more.


So, You'd Like to Own a Model T Ford

Henry Ford's flivver is arguably the most famous car in the world and is certainly the oldest practical antique car to own and drive. Model T's are not only cute, but are robust and easy to maintain. There are so many still in existence that the mid and later model year cars are relatively easy to find and they are inexpensive compared with many other antique vehicles. With an ever growing number of improved low-cost replacement parts and accessories, they become more practical to own each year.

Your choice of car will likely be strongly influenced by many factors, including what is available in your area and perhaps whether you are inheriting a friend's or family member's vehicle. With free choice though, what model year should you buy: the 1909 - 1916 brass radiator cars, the black radiator shell 1917 - 1925 models, or the shiny nickel radiator shell "improved" car of 1926 and 1927? So much depends on what you plan to do with the vehicle . . . to invest, to collect and admire, to show, or to drive.

To invest, collect, or to show, you need to strongly consider a stock car without later model parts and many of the performance accessories available today. Identifying an original car can be a challenge because there were multiple changes and many vehicles have been "updated" over the decades. There are a number of good sources for detail change identification, but the following list will help identify some of the key grouping changes. Most items are taken from Floyd Clymer's book Henry's Wonderful Model T. These comments are focused on the open car, but many apply to closed body styles.

Brass radiator cars

  • 1909 through 1910 cars are generally the high $ vehicles with brass radiators, acetylene gas headlights and wood bodies.
  • 1911 brought steel bodies with the same lines as the earlier cars and more serviceable engines.
  • 1913 saw Ford really increasing production volume: Front passenger side doors were added and new styling closed in the driver side of the body. The transition from leather to leatherette upholstery started at this time.
  • 1914 cars retained the earlier styling but were available only in black. It was the last year for acetylene headlights and cherry-wood dashboards.
  • 1915 brought styling changes, including elimination of windshield braces and introduction of curved rear fenders. Magneto powered electric lights were introduced.
  • 1916 cars are similarly styled to 1915, with minor changes, including a steel hood to replace the aluminum of prior years.

Black radiator shell cars

  • 1917 brought smoother styling with a taller radiator, smooth cowl contour, and crowned curved fenders. Important running gear changes included the introduction of taper roller bearings for the front wheels.
  • 1918 brought a change to the front mounting of the radius rod wish bone.
  • 1919 brought the significant options of electric start with a 6 volt generator, more reliable lighting, and demountable rims, which greatly facilitated tire repair.
  • 1923 brought distinctive styling changes. The car body height was lowered, a taller radiator was introduced, the windshield was tilted back, and a more convenient "one man" top, which did not require vertical supports between the front and rear doors, was introduced.

Improved car

  • 1926 brought the "improved" car with a lowered chassis, nickel plated radiator shell and restyled fenders. Balloon tires and wire wheels were made available and there were important running gear changes, including larger rear brakes with asbestos linings, wider transmission bands and pedals, improved mounting of the transmission cover to the engine and multiple body colors. No longer did you sit over the gas tank. It was mounted "up front" on the firewall with a steady gas flow to the carburetor, even on a steep hill.
  • 1927 saw continuity of the 1926 model. By now the Model T was no longer competitive and the last car was built in June, 1927.

With the many years of production and the wide choice of body styles, it is not possible to identify the car which is ideal for everyone, but I will share my thoughts. If you are considering an investment, or an overall show winner prospect, you almost certainly should consider a brass radiator car. As mentioned earlier, originality will be critical and you need to ensure that you have a knowledgeable friend to help you, and access to good support material such as the Judging Guidelines from the Model T Ford Club of America. What year and which body style? The older, the better and generally open cars are more popular than closed. Within the open cars, roadsters have an edge over touring cars.

If you are looking for a "driver" car, you would be wise to first consider whether you have a strong preference for the brass model styling. If so, look for a car, which has been modified to electric start, with a generator or alternator, and with demountable rim wheels. If you are in a warm zone, a water pump would be an advantage for hilly areas or long runs, show preference for a Ruckstell 2-speed axle, or a Warford auxiliary transmission. If you are not prepared to fuss with ignition timers and coils, you would benefit greatly from a distributor and coil or a solid state coil conversion. In very hilly areas, Rocky Mountain brakes could be a great help, but remember that they act poorly in reverse and you will have lost your hub drum park brakes on pre-1926 axle cars. For engine durability, try to get a car with accessory oil dippers on the connecting rods and a supplementary outside oil line, or be prepared to make those modifications. Be careful on expenditure, as retrofitting all these parts to a stock car will prove expensive. A Texas T and a Snyder's parts catalog can be of great help in estimating expenses if you live in this area. There are also many good "full line" parts distributors throughout the country.

If you want to save a lot of "up front" money, consider a 1917 or later car, which was equipped with, or modified to electric start and demountable rims. The same accessories as previously mentioned will help you greatly, except that the water pump is likely less important on the 1917-22 and unnecessary on the 1923-27 cars, which had progressively larger radiators than the brass cars. It could be argued that every year saw some improvement, but personally I can best afford and can certainly enjoy the 1917-22 cars. I have a slight preference for their styling and they have a higher seating position than the later vehicles.

So what about the best body style for you? Runabouts (Roadsters) have the lightest bodies and are potentially the most sprightly, but do not have room for the grandchildren. Open cars are fun in great weather, but a closed car has distinct advantages on cool days! One ton TT trucks are slow, but a roadster pick-up might be easy to justify. There really is a model to suit almost anyone's preference. It is beyond the scope of this article to talk about the many commonly encountered after-market options, which are available, but provided I'm not character assassinated as a result of this piece, I'll take a crack at some of them in a later article!

Written by the Ancient Briton - Art Langrish



About the Photo at the Top of the Page


The photo in the banner at the top of the page was taken as Ben and Nancy Hardeman parked next to a field of bluebonnets in April, 2010. They were traveling on FM 390 on their way home from a tour through the Brenham/LaGrange, Texas area to see the wildflowers, and the owner of this property gave them permission to park and take the photo. To travel down this road, hop in your Model T and click on this map. They were between points A and B.

Tip for driving your Model T in this area: Wildflowers are abundant in the fields of Texas during the spring time. Always ask permission of land owners before driving onto their property to take photos of the spring wildflowers.

Be sure to inspect these parts on your Model T before you make this drive.

  • all fluids
  • brakes
  • grease and oil at all proper places